Help! Obamacare Took My Doctor Away!

Earlier this week FOX News posted an article about a Washington Examiner survey, which found that many doctors and hospitals are refusing to join the ranks of Obamacare.

“Obamacare applicants across the country are finding their premiums are tripling, their favorite doctors aren’t available, the physicians they can see are often far away.”

From this it would seem the Affordable Care Act is rounding up doctors and relocating them to labor camps. Now, I will admit that I haven’t read all 2,000+ pages of the law, but will somebody from Representative Pelosi’s staff tell me if that kind of language is in there?

I’d be willing to bet that, even with Obamacare in full throttle, your doctor’s office will still be there at the corner of Main and Elm, right where they’ve been for the past however many years.

So why can’t people see their favorite doctor? Or to put it more precisely, why do they think they can’t?

Because when it comes to health care, most Americans have been turned into zombies by the health insurance industry.

Take my history as an example. I’m a 45-year-old asthmatic who went to the doctor more than my fair share as a child. In 1979, I learned how bank accounts work when I saw my mother write a $30 check to cover my office visit with Dr. Bejar.

That was before managed care. Before $5 co-pays lulled every health insurance policyholder into a trance. Before the health insurance industry took over health care, by getting between patients and their physicians.  Before the population was coaxed, coached, and finally convinced that we can only get health care through health insurance.

It’s time to realize that we’ve been duped.

Think about it: If you insist on following the rules of your health insurance policy in exchange for a $20 co-pay, then you might not get to see the doctor of your choice.

But that doesn’t mean you can’t choose your physician. If you aren’t afraid to kick the insurance middleman out your patient-doctor relationship, then you’ll be able to see whomever you like.

How could this make any financial sense though?

With deductibles already averaging over $2,000 a year, filing a doctor’s visit on your health insurance means you are being seriously overcharged.

And when Obamacare kicks in and your deductible really goes through the roof, you (and your family) will pay all your routine health care expenses out of pocket anyway.

So the next time you need to see your doctor, call their office and tell them you don’t want to file on your health insurance. Tell them you want the cash price, and if that’s too much, then let them know you’ll take your business elsewhere if they won’t work with you. Chances are, they will.

At the end of your visit, ask for a receipt. With this, you can a) file your health insurance for credit toward your deductible, and/or b) get reimbursement from your Flex Spending or Health Savings account – tax free!

Although it may mean you’ll have to let go of a few more of those small, green portraits of Andrew Jackson than you would by just paying your co-pay, in the end you’ll come out way ahead.

 

It’s not the COSTS of health care that are outrageous…it’s the CHARGES.

Physician. Health Insurance Agent. Author. Health care humorist. Medical satirist. Disruptor. At your service. My name is Kevin Wacasey, and I’ve been practicing medicine since 1994. When I graduated from medical school, I took an oath to do no harm to my patients. To me, that includes financial harm. But since health insurance took over health care over 40 years ago, health care prices have skyrocketed. And despite what we’re told by the media every day, it isn’t the costs of health care that are outrageous; it’s the charges. So if you’ve ever wondered why we spend so much on health insurance and health care, then come along and join me as I explore the crazy world of Healthcareonomics. Health care doesn’t have to be expensive. Let me show you how. For speaking opportunities and to pass along your questions/comments, please email me at drw@healthcareonomics.com.

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